Archive | October 2012

ULTIMAGIC! Thank you Maklab Glasgow!

Finally I got the wee yellow beastie working!
I AM HAPPY!
Watch this space, some serious making coming this way!!!

*thank you so much to Maklab Glasgow (I’ll be back) and the amazing Jon Hand for your help last night.

20121019-101327.jpg

20121019-101342.jpg

Advertisements

Back from Breda NHTV

Last week I was in Breda in Holland at NHTV University of Applied Sciences giving a guest lecture and holding a workshop on wearables and research through making.

It was great. What a lovely friendly and engaging campus!

Thank you very much to Dr Licia Calvi and Paul Buchanan who run the Interactivity course for making myself and another guest lecturer so very welcome. Here’s to many more collaborations!

Here’s a collage of some of the photographs I took while the workshop was going on.

Students were asked to take some paper and start to fold it and see where they got to. Some of the colour combinations are excellent and the contrasts worked very well. It was a leap of faith as these student mainly work in digital media. At the end of 1 hour they were asked to communicate their results with the other participants which for some had some fantastic concepts attached.

Playing really is valuable for stimulating your ideas factory that can lie dormant in your mind!

 

Printable Headphones

Very cool post on prototypes becoming products!

katiekhau

With 3D printers becoming more accessible we decided to have a think around the concept “life in beta” as a future scenario. What if printed prototypes could become actual products? Meaning, once off the print bed an object could be assembled without any tools and be made functional by readily attainable components. John Mabry decided to stress test the premise with the challenge of making electronically simple yet functionally complex headphones.

My first go resulted in a good-looking functional model created on a professional ABS FDM machine (Dimension 1200ES: print time 13 hours and 30 minutes, hence the name). It worked out well, but the machine we used isn’t accessible to the average maker, and two of the critical parts relied heavily on soluble support printing—a non-issue for professional 3D printers, a major issue for desktop 3D printers.

Last week he started to started to adapt the 13:30 design to the Maker…

View original post 41 more words

%d bloggers like this: